Junior Ganymede
We endeavor to give satisfaction

Manhood Means Responsibility

March 25th, 2015 by G.

What’s the difference between boyhood and manhood? (more…)

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March 25th, 2015 07:00:46

Taking the Eggs for a Sunday Drive

March 23rd, 2015 by G.

On the sweetness of Mormon life. (more…)

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March 23rd, 2015 15:51:31

Men Have Four Great Loves

March 19th, 2015 by G.

Men Have Four Great Loves

Men have four great loves.

The love of a man for a woman;

Of a boy for his mother;

Of brother for brother,

                Of comrades together;

And the love of father and son.

  (more…)

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March 19th, 2015 12:10:37

Life Rolls On

March 17th, 2015 by G.

On the sweetness of Mormon life—a snapshot from this Sunday. (more…)

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March 17th, 2015 08:49:42

Newness Enlarges, Novelty Diminishes

March 11th, 2015 by G.

“Kids these days.”  Lately we’ve been grumbling about novelty and new-fangled nonsenseThe only good new stuff is the old new stuff, yessir.  Grumbling that way is part of our charm.   In the mist of the jeremiads, bashful Nathaniel raised a timid hand.  “But, sir,” the little fellow piped, “I like reading new books and discovering new ideas.  Please, sir, is it very wicked?”

 

Image result for victorian boy

 

(more…)

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March 11th, 2015 14:19:33

Lead Us not Into Doubt and Temptation

March 10th, 2015 by G.

There is a paradox that we overcoming temptations and trials and doubts is necessary to our growth, but at the same time we aren’t supposed to seek them out.  The reason is that the temptations and trials and doubts we seek out are harder to overcome.

when doubting is mistakenly given positive encouragement it turns-out that there are innumerable doubts, which will then mutually-reinforce, and feed-off each other, so multiplying faster then the capacity to overcome them.

-thus Bruce Charlton.

The pioneers trekking across the plain didn’t need to go jogging to sustain their fitness level.  If the handcart pioneers had tried to put in a good five-mile run doing laps around their camp at the end of each day, they would have croaked.

In the same way, we moderns are already surrounded by doubt.  There is no need to detour to find more.

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March 10th, 2015 13:42:13

Repenting through Christ

March 10th, 2015 by G.

Bruce Charlton is thinking deeply about the Atonement. He is working out alternatives to the customary belief that Christ took on the punitive consequences of sin for us and to the customary liberal notion that the atonement was fundamentally an act of symbolic engineering to excise our retrograde belief in sin and guilt. Charlton thinks he’s found one. (more…)

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March 10th, 2015 10:56:59

New is Old

March 09th, 2015 by G.

Last week I was talking to a classical guitarist in a clinic waiting room.  He was there, I suppose, to create a calm and healing atmosphere for the patients.  But between songs, we talked.

(more…)

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March 09th, 2015 08:31:44

Good Deeds Pierce the Veil

March 07th, 2015 by G.

It is night.  You are laying in bed.  The rising moon makes your curtains glow with a faint luminance.  Your mind and body are at rest.  You hear your wife breath in slow rhythm.  You think she is asleep. (more…)

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March 07th, 2015 09:18:01

The First Great Commandment

March 03rd, 2015 by G.

Love is not best considered as a feeling, it is not necessarily something at the forefront of consciousness. For many people, their deepest love is something which structures their life, rather than being at the front of our conscious deliberations for most of the time. Some (I am one of them) are very expressive of love – but this is not a necessity; and some very loving cultures and families and marriages do not go in for statements, hugs or tears.

*

My understanding of the absolute necessity of loving God above all else is metaphysical rather than psychological – that without this, all other loves (including the love of Jesus) lose their meaning and function.

The supremacy of our love for God is that it makes all other loves possible – it makes other loves a matter of eternal significance.

 

-thus Bruce Charlton.

(more…)

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March 03rd, 2015 08:13:41

Love Makes for Hard Justice

February 23rd, 2015 by G.

Justice is what God expects of us. Justice is the standards he holds us to.

The standards he holds us to are impossibly high. We cannot satisfy justice.

Why? (more…)

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February 23rd, 2015 13:00:49

Freedom is Responsibility

February 23rd, 2015 by G.

Freedom is responsibility. (more…)

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February 23rd, 2015 08:29:15

What Does 50 Shades’ Popularity Tell Us?

February 20th, 2015 by Nathaniel Givens

Note: this piece is cross-posted at Nathaniel’s home blog DifficultRun.

964 - 50 Shades Teddy Bear

Almost all of the many articles and blog posts in the lead up to the 50 Shades of Grey release last weekend have been negative, so I had some hope that better sense would prevail and people would stay home rather than prove that controversy and porn are quick and easy paths to profit. That just goes to show you that my sense of cynicism has room to grow. (more…)

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February 20th, 2015 09:18:40

Stalin, Saints, and Signals

February 19th, 2015 by G.

Sozhenitysn writes:

A district Party conference was under way in Moscow Province. It was presided over by a new secretary of the District Party Committee, replacing one recently arrested. At the conclusion of the conference, a tribute to Comrade Stalin was called for. Of course, everyone stood up (just as everyone had leaped to his feet during the conference at every mention of his name). The small hall echoed with “stormy applause, rising to an ovation.” For three minutes, four minutes, five minutes, the “stormy applause, rising to an ovation” continued. But palms were getting sore and raised arms were already aching. And the older people were panting from exhaustion. It was becoming insufferably silly even to those who really adored Stalin. However, who would dare be the first to stop? The secretary of the District Party Committee could have done it. He was standing on the platform, and it was he who had just called for the ovation. But he was a newcomer. He had taken the place of a man who’d been arrested. He was afraid! After all, NKVD men were standing in the hall applauding and watching to see who quit first! And in that obscure, small hall, unknown to the Leader, the applause went on—six, seven, eight minutes! They were done for! Their goose was cooked! They couldn’t stop now till they collapsed with heart attacks! At the rear of the hall, which was crowded, they could of course cheat a bit, clap less frequently, less vigorously, not so eagerly—but up there with the presidium where everyone could see them? The director of the local paper factory, an independent and strong-minded man, stood with the presidium. Aware of all the falsity and all the impossibility of the situation, he still kept on applauding! Nine minutes! Ten! In anguish he watched the secretary of the District Party Committee, but the latter dared not stop. Insanity! To the last man! With make-believe enthusiasm on their faces, looking at each other with faint hope, the district leaders were just going to go on and on applauding till they fell where they stood, till they were carried out of the hall on stretchers! And even then those who were left would not falter. . . . Then after eleven minutes, the director of the paper factory assumed a businesslike expression and sat down in his seat. And, oh, a miracle took place! Where had the universal, uninhibited, indescribable enthusiasm gone? To a man, everyone else stopped dead and sat down. They had been saved! The squirrel had been smart enough to jump off his revolving wheel.

That, however, was how they discovered who the independent people were. And that was how they went about eliminating them. That same night the factory director was arrested. They easily pasted ten years on him on the pretext of something quite different. But after he had signed Form 206, the final document of the interrogation, his interrogator reminded him: “Don’t ever be the first to stop applauding!”

You can find videos of Stalin buzzing an audience to let them know it was safe to stop applauding. (more…)

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February 19th, 2015 08:15:06

This is My Boy. I Love Him and I’m Proud of Him.

February 16th, 2015 by G.

On the sweetness of Mormon life. (more…)

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February 16th, 2015 07:26:44