Junior Ganymede
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Mike Fink is a classical baritone

October 07th, 2017 by Mike Fink

And the most rip-roaring, tub-soaking, hand-winning, shirt-stealing classical baritone you ever laid ear on.

Starting at 38:24, if your browser fails to initialize properly.

Translation:

I am the Abbot of Cockaigne and my counsel is with soaks, and my pleasure is in the order of gamblers and whoever seeks me early in the tavern will leave naked after vespers, and stripped of his clothing he will cry:

Wafna, wafna! What have you done, Luck most foul! You have taken away all the joys of our life!

(“Cockaigne” being roughly equivalent to Never-Never Land.)

Comments (13)
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October 07th, 2017 10:21:35
13 comments

Bruce Charlton
October 7, 2017

Excellent stuff!

Carmina Burana is one of my favourites – and this dramatised movie version from the 70s captures its spirit superbly:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gj-tBVq61as


Vader
October 7, 2017

Hard to image a movie version, but, yeah, it’s excellent stuff. The Los Alamos Choral Society is preparing to perform it next January, and I am seriously considering making the commute to sing with them.

I find it slightly reminiscent of Rite of Spring, but I think I like Carmina Burana better.


Pecos Bill
October 8, 2017

Warn’t Carmina Burana the evil lady villain in one of them Disney car-toons?


Carmina Burana
October 8, 2017

I played the *ahem* antagonist in an independent studio live action production.

Both Orff and Stravinsky had concluded that rhythm was the heart of music, but I believe Orff was the greater composer in that he had a better feel for just how far he could push this idea. No one hums Rite of Spring in the shower; but, for all its emphasis on rhythm, Carmina Burana does not discard melody, and it makes an excellent ear bug.


Bruce Charlton
October 8, 2017

@CB – I certainly prefer Carmina Burana to anything by Stravinsky – but Orff never got anywhere near the level of Carmina Burana in his other works. I know Catulli Carmina and Trionfo di Afrodite quite well; and have listened to Der Mond two or three times – and while (especially the first two named) have some very good stuff in them- they are far below CB. None of Orff’s other work I have been able to find seemed worth a second listen.

Orff was essentially a One Hit Wonder – like probably most creators of the first rate, in classical as well as pop music. (Better than being a No Hit Wonder, like Schoenberg.)


Vader
October 8, 2017

I find Rite of Spring intriguing, but not ultimately satisfying. Same for Petroushka. Orff was a One Hit Wonder, but what a hit!

Stravinsky tried to invoke a “primal” setting for his works, but this ultimately fails, I think, because the anthropological theories of the primal don’t ring true to me. Orff used as his text a very real collection of poems from a very real medieval world that does ring true.

I think the One Hit Wonder is indeed the rule rather than the exception, and not just in musical composition. I rather like Spoon River Anthology, notwithstanding its overall grim tone, but Masters never wrote anything else of note. To Kill a Mockingbird is a genuinely great work, but the recent publication of what appears to have been an early and deeply flawed draft (Go Set a Watchman) only highlights the one-hit aspect of the former. Lucas really produced one hit in his film career, Star Wars, and the rest was just coasting on that success.

For that matter, a lot of Nobel Prizes amount to one-hit wonders. I’m speaking here of the science and (in some cases) economics prizes, which are usually deserving. A lot of the literature and peace prizes would have to be bluntly described as no-hit wonders.


Igor Stravinsky
October 8, 2017

The master composer does not compose music to be sung in the shower.


Bookslinger
October 9, 2017

Orff must have had some sense of humor to compose all that high-falutin’ music for centuries old ribaldry and drunk-talk.

Decoupled from the text, the score of O Fortuna projects power and majesty, hence it’s common cinematic use in battle scenes. Wiki says the first use of O Fortuna in cinema was the 1981 Excaliber film. Snippet is on youtube.


Bruce Charlton
October 9, 2017

We Brits were familiar with O Fortuna from Old Spice aftershave adverts of the 1970s.


Bookslinger
October 9, 2017

Vader
October 9, 2017

The ribald poems have suitably ribald musical settings. The spring poems have suitably light settings. The love poems …. depends on whether it’s really love or lust, to make the distinction made by a lot of our young women’s presidents in the Church.

The power and majesty is mostly reserved for the poems against Fortune. Which make a very suitable frame for the whole piece.

Should be obvious I’m a big fan. I think I will make the commute to sing it with the Los Alamos Choral Society.


Bruce Charlton
October 10, 2017

@Books – I think that was it – there were a few, I think. Embarassingly (for whatever reason) I used Old Spice as an aftershave for quite a while in my teens and early adulthood…

(My current choice after-shaving is probably even more embarassing – the soothing and comforting Johnson’s Baby Lotion.)


Pecos Bill
October 10, 2017

Ifn a feller aint blessed with mah natcheral musk aromer, said feller done outter splash on Hoppes #9 as a co-loan. Blamed ifn the gals don’t flock to to the stuff like cattle to a waller.

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