Junior Ganymede
We endeavor to give satisfaction

You go, brother

March 20th, 2017 by Vader

Comments (5)
Filed under: Birkenhead Drill,Deseret Review | Tags: ,
March 20th, 2017 14:08:30
5 comments

Zen
March 31, 2017

“This inordinate focus upon rights without a commensurate concern about obligations and responsibilities has produced the shrill and demanding entitlement we encounter so often in our contemporary world. People clamor constantly for their individual rights, believing that the highest good is unfettered freedom to pursue their narrow self-interests, while failing to understand that the most important reason for the protection of individual rights is to allow us to live dignified lives that are whole and rich with the duties of faith and family.

Increasingly obscured is the truth that our individual rights find their greatest expression and fulfillment as we, without compulsion, align our rights, our choices, and our responsibilities with the will of God. Voluntarily allowing covenant responsibilities to supersede individual interests and rights is the only surrender that leads to victory.[14] We frequently need to be reminded about the principle we learned early in life and believed was indelibly established and understood by all good men and women: We receive more when we give than when we take.”

We have previously discussed a Constitution 2.0.
Perhaps we need a Bill of Responsibilities to balance the Bill of Rights. I imagine something that detailed what was expected of citizens. It would not be enforced by law, but it would be no less important for detailing what can’t and shouldn’t be enforced, but is still necessary for a healthy civilization.

For instance, as a counterpoint to the Freedom of Religion, we would have a Responsibility to Worship God.
The devil is in the details, of course, how else can we incorporate Responsibilities, for all the Rights we claim?


Vader
March 31, 2017

I rather like this idea. I’ll probably post something soon.


G.
April 1, 2017

“Perhaps we need a Bill of Responsibilities to balance the Bill of Rights. I imagine something that detailed what was expected of citizens. It would not be enforced by law, but it would be no less important for detailing what can’t and shouldn’t be enforced, but is still necessary for a healthy civilization. ”

Fantastic. The original Bill of Rights probably wasn’t meant to be enforceable either. Thomas Jefferson, for instance, said that the main effect would be to make the citizenry alert to when their rights were being trampled on so that they could fight back. That was the case with the 2nd Amendment, for example, until very recently.

I also like this idea.


Bookslinger
April 1, 2017

” I imagine something that detailed what was expected of citizens. It would not be enforced by law, but it would be no less important for detailing what can’t and shouldn’t be enforced, but is still necessary for a healthy civilization.”

I think that would refer to what one of the founders said about the Constitution only working for a religious/righteous/moral people.

2 Corinthians 3:17: Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty.

That could equally be rewritten as: Only where the Spirit of the Lord is, is there liberty.

While that holds for any form of government, I believe it is especially true for our constitition.

Even though atheists love to claim one can be moral without religion, that is not really true. Today’s Western atheists were raised in an overall Christian society that influenced their basic makeup. They received Christian “programming” merely by growing up in the West, even though they don’t outwardly practice it as a religion.

As newer generations are raised in an society/atmosphere of ever decreasing Christian influence, that programming diminishes with each generation. These changes/diminishings are not universal, and don’t happen all at once, therefore many deny they are happening. But those who have observed Western Society for 30 or more years can see the trend.


Zen
April 1, 2017

In that same vein, Books, this article in the Atlantic, notes that our new age of secularism, is not looking auspicious.

“Some observers predicted that this new secularism would ease cultural conflict, as the country settled into a near-consensus on issues such as gay marriage…. That was naive. Secularism is indeed correlated with greater tolerance of gay marriage and pot legalization. But it’s also making America’s partisan clashes more brutal. And it has contributed to the rise of both Donald Trump and the so-called alt-right movement, whose members see themselves as proponents of white nationalism. As Americans have left organized religion, they haven’t stopped viewing politics as a struggle between “us” and “them.” Many have come to define us and them in even more primal and irreconcilable ways.”

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/04/breaking-faith/517785/

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