Junior Ganymede
We endeavor to give satisfaction

Making Ourselves Perfect

May 10th, 2016 by G.

File:2015 Law Enforcement Explorers Conference team scaling a wall.jpg

Perhaps our understanding of priesthood genealogy is so broad that we expect all Church members to think of priesthood genealogy as we do. In our understanding it includes the whole plan of salvation, in which, through righteous living and revealed sacred ordinances, families are bound together eternally, worthy to live in the celestial kingdom in the very presence of God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Ghost in an exalted, resurrected state. Perhaps we have been too subtle.
Stated, then, in simple words, I say to every member of the Church that you have a personal, individual responsibility to become engaged in priesthood genealogical activity. The real impact of the priesthood genealogy program is one of individual responsibility. The actual work must be performed by individuals, not by organizations. What is everybody’s business is nobody’s business, so I must say that this work is your individual responsibility.

Elder Marvin J. Ashton

Last week last General Conference inspired me with a concept of how impressive and important one of us, just one of us, raised to Godhood would be. It would justify the universe. It would be enough for God to make it his work.

A few days later in that opening from being asleep to being awake, I half dreamed about that one God, son or daughter of God, and his attitude to the people who got him there. He would dance with the ones that brung ’em. He would make ever effort, having ascended, to reach down and lift those further down.

Then, coincidentally, I got up to read the next talk on my list from the October 1972 General Conference. It was Elder Ashton’s talk, quoted above. Coincidentally. Ha!

No one can be made perfect until their life is perfected. All things are before our face in heaven, they say. We ourselves are not perfect–we lack sufficient love or forgiveness or gratitude or delight for the people and places and events of our lives–until we have done all we can to make them perfect also. This may not mean deification. The utter ability and endles time and means of that divine person means they can perfect everyone up to the point their free will can possibly bear. But not beyond. A shattered will is also imperfection.

Those loved ones who themselves ascend to heaven will turn and do the same to their own lives. For those who do not, their perfecters will. Would a loving Father in Heaven neglect his children? Never. Neither would a loving earthly father in heaven, or a mother, or son, or great aunt.

So from that one deified soul ascension and perfection moves out in a spreading, mounting wave. The rock cut out without hands has created a splash that will roll over the whole earth.

 

That is genealogy work.

Other Posts from the October 1972 General Conference, Friday Afternoon

Nathaniel Givens A Grand Fundamental Principle http://difficultrun.nathanielgivens.com/2016/05/10/a-grand-fundamental-principle
G. Making Ourselves Perfect http://www.jrganymede.com/2016/05/10/making-ourselves-perfect/
J. Max Wilson
Daniel Ortner God Will Let You Know https://symphonyofdissent.wordpress.com/2016/05/09/god-will-let-you-know/
John Hancock
Ralph Hancock
Michelle Linford
Walker Wright http://difficultrun.nathanielgivens.com/2016/05/10/ill-be-there-for-you/
SilverRain
Michael Worley
Chastity Wilson
Jan Tolman Rise Above “Normal” http://www.ldswomenofgod.com/rise-above-normal/
Comments (17)
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May 10th, 2016 07:30:31
17 comments

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Bruce Charlton
May 10, 2016

I can’t work out the symbolic significance of the top photo, of people climbing over the wall…?


Bookslinger
May 10, 2016

BC, those who have ascended are reaching downward to help the rest ascend. And those who have ascended can only help those who are themselves making an effort to ascend. And, among those who have yet to ascend, it appears to be a team effort.


G.
May 10, 2016

@BC, its a common teambuilding exercise. You start with everybody on the bottom, everybody pyramids to get one person up, then that person helps bring up the next person, and so on.


Wm Jas
May 10, 2016

What exactly does Elder Ashton mean by “priesthood genealogy”? Despite my LDS background, I don’t believe I’ve ever encountered the term.


Bruce Charlton
May 10, 2016

Oh yeah… obvious now you say it.

I did this wall exercise as a youth – third picture down (but I ‘m behind the camera).

http://baronofjesmond.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/outward-bound-burghead-scotland-summer.html


G.
May 11, 2016

It’s not a usual term. I believe he just means genealogy conducted under the direction of the priesthood, or with an eye to sealing ordinances.


G.
May 11, 2016

That looks like a wonderful camp.


Bruce Charlton
May 11, 2016

@G – The camp was certainly a learning experience – but not one I would have wished to repeat. But as an ex-military/ mission man, you would probably have found it tame enough.

‘WmJas & G – I didn’t know the term (unsurprisingly!), so did some Googling. My impression was that each modern Melchizedeck priesthood holder was being asked to study his personal genealogy leading from the men who made him a priest, through all the links back to Joseph Smith or Oliver Cowdery and the Restoration, and before that (which would be the same for everyone presumably) through Jesus and the ancient Hebrew priests to the man himself.


G.
May 11, 2016

True, but that does not appear to be what Elder Ashton has in mind in the linked talk.


SMOD
May 12, 2016

Love the graphic.


Wm Jas
May 12, 2016

Bruce, that’s usually called one’s “line of authority.” I also assumed at first that that’s what Elder Ashton was talking about, but it didn’t make sense in context.


JKC
May 13, 2016

I also thought, at first glance, that priesthood geneology was talking about lines of authority.

I realize that you’re probably not trying to speak with any great degree of precision, but strictly speaking, the way the church tracks priesthood lines of authority, it is not through the man that made you a priest, but the man who ordained you to your current office in the Melchizedek priesthood. This means that if, for example, your father ordained you an Elder, and was ordained an Elder by his father, but was ordained a high priest by his Stake President, the line of authority is tracked through your Stake President, rather than through your father. Ultimately, it all goes to the same source, so it’s probably not all that significant.


Andrew
May 13, 2016

I like this train of thought G, including your previous post about the whole Universe made to save one soul. It really opens up the commandments to a magical and Universal sense.

At times I’ve thought how amazing it would be to know Christ as a friend, and here you allude to the possibility of a friend really being elevated to that sainthood, to really be friends with Christ.

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