Junior Ganymede
We endeavor to give satisfaction

College is For Crap

February 24th, 2010 by G.

Yeah, I pretty much agree. We should cut out college for everyone except the teetotalers, and them only if their parents don’t pay for it.

Comments (8)
Filed under: We transcend your bourgeois categories | Tags: , ,
February 24th, 2010 14:51:05
8 comments

Vader
February 24, 2010

I pretty much agree, too. College is going to be wasted on some people, including (apparently) about 40% of those who now matriculate.

I think the best we can do, and should expect to do, is to provide it for those whose productivity can really benefit from it and for those who really love learning — two groups that don’t necessarily overlap very much. If you’re not going to benefit from it in your productivity, the economics argument for it is out the window; if you don’t really like learning, the liberal education ideal is irrelevant.

One of things I liked about graduate school at a top university was that everyone there seemed to be there because they really thought learning stuff was neat. There’s a similar morale at Death Star, Inc., where in addition to most of us having a love of learning, most of us also share a passion for watching things blow up.


gst
February 24, 2010

A lot of the kids in 4 year colleges should be in community colleges and vocational/technical programs.


Bruce Nielson
February 24, 2010

I very grateful for my education, even though I had no appreciation for it at the time. Without it, I doubt the whole desire to learn would have opened up for me later in life.


Johnna
February 25, 2010

Now that McCain-Feingold has been struck down, I figure if corporations can bribe contribute unlimitedly to the campaigns of public officials, I can throw my money at putting my kids through college in wild hopes of improving their adult lives. Though both probably result, overall, in diminished opportunities for people in general.


Adam G.
February 25, 2010

Johnna,

I think what was struck down was limits on corporations spending money on their own political ads and stuff. They still have limits on how much they can contribute directly to a candidate.

Also, agreed that while the way our society treats college is stupid, as long as our society is the way it is, your kids are better off financially and status-wise with a good degree. Though the savvy parent will want to keep a watch on just how much they subsidize it: adulthood should and could begin at 18, there’s no real advantage to being a lotos-eater for several years at college. My dad gave me $50 bucks and the occasional frequent flier miles for Christmas and health insurance, and that was it.


Johnna
February 25, 2010

Your McCain-Feingold clarification provides some comfort, but I have no doubt we’ll see corporations supporting candidates indirectly.

It’s good to hear working yourself through college worked out well for you, since I may not be able to support my kids’ college educations as much as I intend.

I worked my way through college, and I think a less spartan approach would have been more ideal. Some opportunities were out of reach (BYU study abroad, frex). I was more self-focused, less compassionate, in the press to make rent, feed myself, and stay in school. After I married I transferred to his school and was working 30 hours a week, except for that glorious semester when I only worked 10. It was fun to make the Dean’s list; it was fun to have more energy to think clearly about my studies. I wish everyone could go to college working only 10 hours.


Adam G.
February 25, 2010

Anything more than 20 is tough.


Johnna
February 25, 2010

“anything more than 20 is stuff,” I’ll have to think about that. I was close to the bottom on the scale of stuff

Though health care could definitely be a reason I was working more than 20 hours.

[Editor's note: "stuff" in the comment you respond to was a typo for "tough." We regret the error]

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