Junior Ganymede
We endeavor to give satisfaction

Can Christianity save the West? And which church?

September 19th, 2017 by Bookslinger

Bruce C has written of a need for return to basic/mere Christianity in his blog albionawakening.blogspot.com/ (more…)

Comments (10)
Filed under: Deseret Review | Tags: , , , , ,
September 19th, 2017 17:56:53

Proud of Joseph

September 19th, 2017 by G.

Image result for joseph smith first vision statue

We are rightly proud of Joseph Smith.

(more…)

Comments (4)
Filed under: Deseret Review | Tags: ,
September 19th, 2017 07:26:06

Age

September 18th, 2017 by G.

Age is when even your embarrassing memories start to fade.

Comments (0)
Filed under: Deseret Review | Tags:
September 18th, 2017 12:09:19

September Canyon

September 18th, 2017 by G.

On the sweetness of Southwest/American/Mormon life. (more…)

Comments (2)
Filed under: Brilliantly Lit,Deseret Review | No Tag
No Tag
September 18th, 2017 05:46:57

Bricks

September 18th, 2017 by G.

I can’t tell you the number of couples I have counseled who, when they are deeply hurt or even just deeply stressed, reach farther and farther into the past to find yet a bigger brick to throw through the window “pain” of their marriage. . . . [I]t is not right to go back and open up some ancient wound that the Son of God Himself died trying to heal.

-thus Elder Holland

Comments (2)
Filed under: Deseret Review | Tags:
September 18th, 2017 05:13:44

Religion for Atheists

September 17th, 2017 by Zen

Or in other words, why religion is needed, even for the disbelievers.

In my limited experience, while atheists disbelieve in Deity, they still have a sense (if incomplete) of what right and wrong is. Let us give credit where credit is due.

From that great respository of human knowledge, Wikipedia
“There is no scholarly consensus over the definition of “religion”. Conventionally, a “religion” is any cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural or transcendental. Religions relate humanity to what anthropologist Clifford Geertz has referred to as a cosmic “order of existence”.” (more…)

Comments (3)
Filed under: We transcend your bourgeois categories | No Tag
No Tag
September 17th, 2017 21:22:35

Undocumented Renters

September 15th, 2017 by G.

No doubt they had begun to put down roots at the apartment, and were therefore justified in resisting removal from an apartment that Americans will not rent. As it happens, both also had reason to dread repatriation to their legal place of residence, as in that place both would be subject to persecution by officious busybodies wielding warrants for “robbery,” “theft,” and “non-payment of child support.”

Obviously, compassionate men and women will see them as dreamers and refugees

-from here

Comments (0)
Filed under: Deseret Review | No Tag
No Tag
September 15th, 2017 07:37:00

Big Google Brother

September 15th, 2017 by G.

Google skews search results in favor of hard left sites and tries to steer people away from even mainstream conservative sites. In our democracy, non-citizens are routinely registered to vote, there is growing evidence of ineligible voters voting, as we have documented here, and we use voting technology that we are not sure is secure or that we can even know is secure.

I am not surprised.

Antitrust now.

Comments (7)
Filed under: Deseret Review | No Tag
No Tag
September 15th, 2017 06:10:17

Heaven Help Us

September 14th, 2017 by Bertie

That blighter Steggles is making book on jihadis.

One instinctively sees how the thing will work, of course. Each attack is scored by the victims and the number of candelight vigils–though one does wonder if the jihadi himself will count if he kills himself also, surely the race stewards can only grant partial credit –and then the competitors are compared with due adjustments for their handicap.

All the same, is nothing sacred? One does have one’s code, dash it. The thing is scarcely preux. (more…)

Comments (1)
Filed under: Brilliantly Lit | No Tag
No Tag
September 14th, 2017 09:46:38

Christian Hurricane Relief

September 13th, 2017 by G.

Christians have provided more hurricane relief than FEMA.

Purpose-built solutions are less powerful and less flexible than purposeful people.

Comments (0)
Filed under: We transcend your bourgeois categories | No Tag
No Tag
September 13th, 2017 16:56:36

Air Quote Democracy

September 13th, 2017 by G.

In the monarchies, it was treason for the queen to dally.  The succession was of the utmost importance.

Similarly, in the Roman Republic, it was treason to propose a return to the monarchy.  They took their form of government seriously.

In our democracy, non-citizens are routinely registered to vote, there is growing evidence of ineligible voters voting, as we have documented here, and we use voting technology that we are not sure is secure or that we can even know is secure.

What are we doing about it? Not much. There is no sense of crisis.

Is there something uniquely defective about democracy, is our democracy dying, or do we only have an airquote democracy? I dunno.

Comments (0)
Filed under: Deseret Review | Tags: ,
September 13th, 2017 10:08:28

The Great American Eclipse

September 13th, 2017 by The Junior Ganymede

As seen by friend of the Junior Ganymede, Kent Budge.

If you are impatient of the geologic ramblings, you may skip to the good stuff here.

 

Comments (5)
Filed under: We transcend your bourgeois categories | No Tag
No Tag
September 13th, 2017 06:45:09

That Kind of Trust

September 12th, 2017 by G.

... Christ: Do you know the way to Emmaus? - The United Methodist Church

Elder Packer refers to “that kind of trust which makes it possible to talk of serious, even sacred things.” (more…)

Comments (0)
Filed under: We transcend your bourgeois categories | Tags:
September 12th, 2017 07:30:29

Coping with a happy childhood…

September 12th, 2017 by Bruce Charlton

The Enchanted Places by Christopher Milne, 1974

This is one of the best autobiographies I have read; perhaps because it has a fascinating theme, satisfyingly discussed – as well as being very well written, by someone whose personality was sympathetic to me.

The main explicit theme is that of living (up to age 52 at the time of writing) with the strange and vast fame of being Christopher Robin from the four books published by his father in a four year period from 1924-8: two collections of poems – When we were very young, and Now we are six; and two volumes of Winnie-the-Pooh stories – Winnie-the-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner.

Christopher Robin’s response to these books was positive as a young boy, but became negative as an older child, adolescent and young adult; mainly because he was an exceptionally shy and sensitive person (a trait inherited, with interest, from grandfather Milne, he tells us). Try as he might, he simply never got used-to the endless parade of people who made comments about this; and never was able to react spontaneously and appropriately – but became tongue tied and embarrassed. However, writing the autobiography was a coming-to-terms with the whole situation – and this provides a satisfying sense of closure to the book.

The implicit theme, which really gripped me, was the question: What to do with the rest of your life, after having a very happy childhood?

This was also the question that dominated the life of Christopher Robin’s father – AA Milne himself; and consequently Christopher writes extremely well about the father with whom (especially aged 9-18, after his Nanny had left) he had such a close and empathic relationship.

It is also a question which has been very much a part of my own life trajectory; since I too had a very happy childhood including early-middle teen years, and I too felt (for a long time) that adult life did not remotely match-up. Indeed, according to the most vivid and cherished memories, one of the best aspects of being a non-child was the reawakening triggered by loving relationships with younger children – first my brother, later my own children.

Neither Christopher Robin nor his father ever came to terms with this, or found a way of regarding post-childhood life as anything other than a let-down – to be escaped-from to some extent, but never integrated with the world of work, chores, and shallow public interactions.

 

Read the whole thing at Bruce Charlton’s Notions

Comments (1)
Filed under: We transcend your bourgeois categories | No Tag
No Tag
September 12th, 2017 05:48:39

Regret de Escalier

September 11th, 2017 by G.

It was one of those long traveling conversations that started with ‘what brings you to X?’ and ended up mostly on the biological roots of human nature.  The sexes, and status climbing, and chimp tribalism.  He was really interested in it.  Then I mentioned where I’d gone to school and that I’d been a missionary and he laughed and said he’d been a missionary too.  Then he looked at me narrowly and said he didn’t meet many LDS who believed in evolution.  I shrugged.  But from things he’d said, a prior reference to Jerry Coyne and other details, especially to the way he talked about evolution, I suddenly wondered if he had lost his faith.  The thought was a bit of shock to me, frankly, and my conversation stuttered out.

The thought crossed  my mind “tell him that Jerry Coyne is also a chimp,” but I hesitated, and then the routines of travel split us up.

I wish I had told him, “Jerry Coyne is also a chimp.”

Comments (3)
Filed under: Deseret Review | No Tag
No Tag
September 11th, 2017 06:34:25